Click here for Home
About Pat Patterns News Archives Tips & Tricks Pat's Columns Contact HCK Download How-To
 High Country Knitwear Home

Visit HCK Gifts!

New Projects!

HCK's Shopping Tote


Altiplano Vest

Andes Sweater

Balaclava

Bison Scarf

Breton & Rugby Shirts

Caroller's Hooded Scarf

Cowboy Hat

Crested Butte Hat

Cuff Kerchief & Not-a-Scarf

Cuzco Bags & Peruvian Motifs

Felted Digital Camera Bag

Fingerless Mittens

Filet Crochet Shawl

Fitted Vest
-

Knitted Shirt

Multi-Size Mittens

Natasha Sweater

Polar Bear Scarf

Pussycat Scarf

Raccoon Scarf

Sheep Scarf

Silver Streak Sweater

Socks 101

Socks 201

Steamboater Sweater

Storm Hood
 
Turtleneck Dickey
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Raccoon Scarf

As you can see from the photograph, this is an abundant, warm, fuzzy scarf, meant to be worn with the head in front, and the rest of the scarf hung back across it with the tail hanging down in back. And, yes, it is a little weird.

This is not the easiest thing to knit, because it involves some tricky increasing on the head, and intarsia for the body, but if you like getting ohhhhhs and ahhhhhs and the occasional pat from a stranger, this is the scarf for you. And he’s interesting to work on, because you’re dying to see how he’ll come out.

The Materials you'll need for this Knitting Project:

  • Small amounts of a white and a black bulky for the face, and of an oak tan bulky for the paws
  • 2 balls each of a chocolate brown knitting worsted to combine with 2 balls of a fuzzy synthetic and mohair novelty yarn for the dark part of the body, and 1 ball each of a white knitting worsted combined with one ball of a matching mostly white fuzzy novelty yarn for the white parts of the body. Each color will be made up of two strands held together.
  • For the body, wind a ball of the two browns, and keep it in a plastic zipper bag from the Supermarket; for the white, cut six or eight foot strands of the white yarns.
  • You’ll need a couple of buttons for the eyes, a small crochet hook for the ears, and #10 or 10 ˝ needles for the body, plus double-pointed # 9 needles and polyester stuffing or spare acrylic yarn for the tail. Of course, you’ll need a tape measure and a blunt tipped yarn needle for weaving in the ends.
  • The inspiration behind this scarf pattern
    I know they raid the garbage. I know they're pests. But they're humorous: smart, clownish, amusing, and--thanks to an orphaned one, who grew to independence in the shelter of my garage, and whom we called "Oliver" after Oliver Twist, because he always seemed to be saying, "More, please, ma'am!"--I like them. I like the association with Davy Crockett; I like the association with the college boys of the 20s, with their flappers and bootleg whiskey. What better companion could one have, on a winter day?